Resign, resign or return to the same company?

During the pandemic, countless workers switched jobs in hopes of a better working life. Unfortunately, many went too early …

HR and WFM software vendor UKG conducted a study to understand this trend.

The purpose of this project was to gain a better understanding of the mood and principles of layoffs and leaders, and to better understand what happened during ‘the great resignation’. It also looked in depth at the exact reasons for the resignation and the changes that managers and organizations could have made to retain staff at the time.

What has the research yielded?
Worldwide, 2 out of 5 workers say that their old jobs were better and that they often encounter the same problems in their new business, but without the familiar faces and familiar work routines. As many as 1 in 5 employees have now returned to work for the company they left during the pandemic (known as ‘boomerang workers’), and millions of workers are open to the possibility of returning to their former employer.

In the Netherlands, we think the longest before we resign, and it takes us an average of five months to reach a decision. It makes us more confident, because only a third indicate that they were better off with their old company. This may also have to do with the reasons for leaving Dutch employees provide, as these are often problems that cannot be solved easily, such as frustration over leadership or a bad corporate culture. As in Germany, 55% of Dutch redundancies believe that nothing would change with their former employer if they returned.

What was the reason the workers resigned?
Unfortunately, there is a big difference in the perception of managers and outgoing employees.
While employees and managers agree that salary dissatisfaction is the main cause of layoffs, managers and companies seem to be unaware of the other factors contributing to layoffs. Could it be that employees do not dare to state what they really think about their company? Do they trust their leader? Is there actually a good way to clearly communicate both frustrations and needs? Or could it be that managers are simply not paying enough attention to their employees’ feelings and employee experience?

Why managers think staff leave:
1. Salary / fringe benefits
2. Family / care of children / private reasons
Too many COVID measures at work
4. Imbalance between work and private life / burnout
Too few opportunities to further develop your career
Travel time too long

Why employees actually resign:
1. Salary / fringe benefits
2. Because they do not feel valued or not at home
3. Imbalance between work and private life / burnout
Too few opportunities to further develop your career
5. Management frustrations
Poor corporate culture

Only 49% of employees travel to get a higher salary elsewhere; more than half of the employees resign for other reasons.

What about leaders?
Although managers make a significant contribution to employee retention, it is precisely the managers themselves who are now also thinking of resigning (40% worldwide). This is due in part to the enormous workload they experienced during (and after the end) of the pandemic. They were to create customized ways of working and work plans that could adapt to different work environments and meet the needs of all employees. Leaders were also (rightly) asked to pay more attention to the mental well-being of their team members. Add to that the piles of resignation letters and the extra workload that this creates, and you understand exactly why so many leaders want to go another way.

How to resolve the situation?
Both employees and managers are considering resigning. There is also clearly a trust gap between managers and employees that needs to be addressed. Building a positive, modern work environment where people trust each other is a universal, important factor in achieving business success.
Learn more about our research results and see all our top tips for retaining your talent by downloading our report: “Take up, resigned or resigned?”

About UKG
At UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group), people are at the center, and we believe that organizations are more successful when they put their people first. This mindset has helped UKG grow into one of the largest cloud HR companies in the world. Our industry-leading solutions help HR, managers and employees become more productive, drive better employee engagement, proactively manage compliance globally and prepare companies for future challenges. UKG’s HR Service Delivery platform consists of solutions such as case management, process automation and employee file management. Our Workforce Management solutions help your staff create schedules, realize time tracking, estimate your company’s future staffing needs and more. UKG employs more than 14,000 people worldwide and our corporate culture is widely recognized. UKG has won numerous awards for corporate culture, products and services and has been named on the Fortune 100 list of “Best Companies to Work For” for several years in a row. For more information about UKG, visit ukg.com/nl.

Research results are based on a study conducted at the request of UKG by Morning Consult between 23 December 2021 and 22 January 2022 in the United States, United Kingdom, Mexico, the Netherlands, Germany and France. The participants in this study were divided into two separate groups: a group of 1,950 employees who have voluntarily resigned or changed jobs since the start of the pandemic in March 2020, and a group of 1,850 managers who have been managers for at least six months. been active and have seen at least one team member leave during the pandemic. The purpose of this project was to gain a better understanding of the mood and principles of layoffs and leaders, and to better understand what happened during ‘the great resignation’. It also looked in depth at the exact reasons for the resignation and the changes that managers and organizations could have made to retain staff at the time. All interviews with participants in this study were conducted online and with individuals aged 18 years or older.

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