Albert Heijn initiates collaboration with WWF to limit the ecological impact – Companies

The supermarket chain Albert Heijn is being guided by the WWF to halve the organic footprint of fresh and non-perishable products by 2030. They have signed a two-year cooperation agreement to that end.

By joining forces, Albert Heijn (AH) and WWF Holland want to accelerate the sustainability of the supermarket supply chain. For example, the effect of, for example, deforestation and freshwater consumption on the fresh and sustainable chains is examined in more detail.

In the coming period, both parties will elaborate on the approach, based on experience from WWF in the UK with five major UK supermarkets, including Tesco.

Halve the footprint by 2030

The plan is to develop a scientific plan for supermarkets that provides insight into what it takes to halve the food system’s ecological footprint – and quickly: by 2030.

“If we all want to live within the planet’s boundaries by 2050, it means we need to redirect biodiversity loss to recovery, further combat climate change, use less land and stop destroying natural areas,” says Nathalie van Koot from WWF Holland. . ‘It’s a huge task, but it’s very urgent. To achieve this, we must halve the global footprint of food consumption on these four points by 2030. ‘

To achieve this, the collaboration with AH will focus, among other things, on improving chain traceability, making the supply of fish more sustainable, promoting biodiversity in agriculture and innovations in collaboration with farmers and growers of citrus fruits, rice and tomatoes. .

Consumer benchmark

“We want to provide a land that can be passed on to future generations, and food plays a significant role in this,” said Marit van Egmond, CEO of Albert Heijn. ‘Different eating patterns, smart ways to produce and package, waste control. In this way, we can tackle the impact on climate, biodiversity and animal welfare. By working with the WWF, we can take even more positive steps, both in the chains further afield and nearby. ‘

‘Consumers must be able to trust that the production of groceries in the shopping basket has not been at the expense of nature,’ adds Kirsten Schuijt, director of WWF Holland.

One initiative that has already been launched with us is the ‘Superlist’. From this autumn, Belgian consumers will have a scoring system in their hands that examines the environmental efforts of Colruyt, Delhaize, Carrefour, Aldi and Lidl.

By joining forces, Albert Heijn (AH) and WWF Holland want to accelerate the sustainability of the supermarket supply chain. For example, the effects of deforestation and freshwater consumption on the fresh and sustainable chains will be further explored. In the coming period, both parties will elaborate on the approach, based on experience from WWF in the UK with five major UK supermarkets. including Tesco. The plan is to develop a scientific plan for supermarkets that provides insight into what it takes to halve the food footprint’s ecological footprint – and that fast: by 2030. of the globe, that means we need to redirect biodiversity loss towards recovery , further combat climate change, use less land and stop destroying natural areas’, says Nathalie van Koot from WWF Holland. ‘It’s a huge task, but it’s very urgent. To achieve this, we must halve the global footprint of food consumption on these four points by 2030. make the fishery more sustainable, promote biodiversity in agriculture and innovation in collaboration with farmers and growers of citrus fruits, rice and tomatoes “We want to transfer a land that can be lived for future generations, and food plays a significant role in this, “says Marit van Egmond, CEO of Albert Heijn. ‘Different eating patterns, smart ways to produce and package, waste control. In this way, we can tackle the impact on climate, biodiversity and animal welfare. By collaborating with WWF, we can take even more positive action, both in the chains further afield and nearby. ” Consumers must be able to trust that the production of groceries in the shopping basket is not at the expense of nature. adds Kirsten Schuijt, Director of WWF Nederland aan. An initiative that has already been launched with us is ‘Superlijst’. From this autumn, Belgian consumers will have a scoring system in their hands that examines the environmental efforts of Colruyt, Delhaize, Carrefour, Aldi and Lidl.

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